IF YOU FIND THIS CONTENT USEFUL, FUN OR JUST PLAIN AWESOME, PLEASE:
                                    COPYRIGHT © DEESULTIMATEREVIEWS.COM 2013-2015. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED..
HOME LITERARY CORNER CULTURAL  CORNER 10 BEST/ MOST LIFESTYLE& FITNESS AROUND  THE WORLD PLAY&MUSICAL  REVIEWS CONCERT&SHOW  REVIEWS MUSEUM&EXHIBITION  REVIEWS RESTAURANT  REVIEWS BAR&CLUB  REVIEWS
RATING  ****** excellent   ***** very good      ****good      *** average      ** pretty bad      * horrible
CLICK TO VIEW THE 10 MOST BEAUTIFUL OPERA ARIAS
AIDA ****** GIUSEPPE VERDI CAST: The King of Egypt: Paolo Pecchioli Amneris: Kate Aldrich Aida: Adina Aaron Radames: Scott Piper Director and Set Designer: Franco Zeffirelli Orchestra and Choir of: Fondazione Arturo Toscanini Conductor: Massililiano Stefanelli This adaptation of Aida can be counted among the many successful staging enterprises undertaken by the famous director Franco Zeffirelli. This version was put on in a very intimate setting, a small 350-seat theater, but that does not in any way diminish its extremely high artistic level: the stunning quality of the voices, costumes or decorations. All the performers in this piece were relatively young singers at the time: this production was basically viewed as their debut on the international stage. For that they have done an incredible job interpreting this demanding opera, had I not known about their novice status, I would have held them for seasoned professionals. This staging definitely maintains the classical character of this masterpiece, we encounter none of the modern day modifications so eagerly used (and often over-used) by some directors. The opulent costumes are kept Egyptian to the core; also the decorations are infused with the Ancient spirit, as is the traditional heavy make-up. All of those elements delighted me with their elaborate nature and helped me to easily and completely transform into that exotic world. Also the religious aspect was presented rather prominently and served to create an atmosphere of slightly unsettling mystique. Apart from the obvious vocal merits (beautiful, highly accomplished voices for artists so young and inexperienced), the performers are all really attractive and cast true to what I would imagine them to look like, down to the very detail like the fact that Aida, an Ethiopian Princess, is played by an African-American artist.   I must admit that the main actors in this drama (worth noting is that in this opera both Aida and Artemis share the spot of the leading lady and get an equal amount of stage time alongside the main male protagonist Radames) enthralled me completely with the portrayal of their pain, moral dilemmas, impossible loyalties and the overwhelming power of their feelings. And yes, it is a fabulously tragic love triangle (another one, ugh), but here none of the protagonists is truly evil or villainous:  we can understand and respect all of their motives and actions without hating or actually condemning anyone. Just one of those things: two girls love one boy, he makes his choice, someone ends up devastated.  However, despite the emotional turmoil this opera focuses primarily on ensemble scenes: duets, trios, whole groups featuring extras, some of which could only be described as mind-blowing (scenes, not extras, although surely those also possess some dynamite qualities), an unforgettable spectacle for the eye and rare musical treat for the ear, conducted with perfect harmony and attention to detail. The ballet numbers in the temple were particularly enchanting to watch, the choreography flawless, the dancers magnificent in their fluidity and grace. I would absolutely recommend this production to anyone who favors an elegant, classically inclined staging of this timeless piece. Aida undoubtedly belongs to the more interesting masterpieces in the operatic repertoire and can be easily categorized as a must-see for every Verdi fan! BUY ON AMAZON:

Follow Us

VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!!  VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!! VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!! CARPE DIEM!!! CARPE DIEM!!! CARPE DIEM!!!
NAVIGATION MENU
AIDA ****** GIUSEPPE VERDI CAST: The King of Egypt: Paolo Pecchioli Amneris: Kate Aldrich Aida: Adina Aaron Radames: Scott Piper Director and Set Designer: Franco Zeffirelli Orchestra and Choir of: Fondazione Arturo Toscanini Conductor: Massililiano Stefanelli This adaptation of Aida can be counted among the many successful staging enterprises undertaken by the famous director Franco Zeffirelli. This version was put on in a very intimate setting, a small 350-seat theater, but that does not in any way diminish its extremely high artistic level: the stunning quality of the voices, costumes or decorations. All the performers in this piece were relatively young singers at the time: this production was basically viewed as their debut on the international stage. For that they have done an incredible job interpreting this demanding opera, had I not known about their novice status, I would have held them for seasoned professionals. This staging definitely maintains the classical character of this masterpiece, we encounter none of the modern day modifications so eagerly used (and often over- used) by some directors. The opulent costumes are kept Egyptian to the core; also the decorations are infused with the Ancient spirit, as is the traditional heavy make-up. All of those elements delighted me with their elaborate nature and helped me to easily and completely transform into that exotic world. Also the religious aspect was presented rather prominently and served to create an atmosphere of slightly unsettling mystique. Apart from the obvious vocal merits (beautiful, highly accomplished voices for artists so young and inexperienced), the performers are all really attractive and cast true to what I would imagine them to look like, down to the very detail like the fact that Aida, an Ethiopian Princess, is played by an African- American artist.   I must admit that the main actors in this drama (worth noting is that in this opera both Aida and Artemis share the spot of the leading lady and get an equal amount of stage time alongside the main male protagonist Radames) enthralled me completely with the portrayal of their pain, moral dilemmas, impossible loyalties and the overwhelming power of their feelings. And yes, it is a fabulously tragic love triangle (another one, ugh), but here none of the protagonists is truly evil or villainous:  we can understand and respect all of their motives and actions without hating or actually condemning anyone. Just one of those things: two girls love one boy, he makes his choice, someone ends up devastated.  However, despite the emotional turmoil this opera focuses primarily on ensemble scenes: duets, trios, whole groups featuring extras, some of which could only be described as mind-blowing (scenes, not extras, although surely those also possess some dynamite qualities), an unforgettable spectacle for the eye and rare musical treat for the ear, conducted with perfect harmony and attention to detail. The ballet numbers in the temple were particularly enchanting to watch, the choreography flawless, the dancers magnificent in their fluidity and grace. I would absolutely recommend this production to anyone who favors an elegant, classically inclined staging of this timeless piece. Aida undoubtedly belongs to the more interesting masterpieces in the operatic repertoire and can be easily categorized as a must-see for every Verdi fan! BUY ON AMAZON:
 DEE’S ULTIMATE REVIEWS
CLICK TO VIEW THE 10 MOST BEAUTIFUL OPERA ARIAS

Follow Us