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NATIONAL  ATOMIC TESTING MUSEUM ******      LAS VEGAS Located in a rather large and imposing building about 10 minutes away from the Strip, this museum is definitely one of the more interesting (and ambitious) attractions Las Vegas has to offer. Basically it consists of two parts: The Area 51 Exhibit and the Permanent Exhibits. If you decide to pay this particular establishment a visit here is what you can expect: AREA 51 – MYTH OR REALITY Unfortunately photography was not permitted in this section, so you will just have to take my word for it. I vouch for my honestly and upstanding character. So here we go. Immediately upon entering the rooms you are enveloped in some rather fierce extraterrestrial vibes: eerie atmosphere, with darkness all around you and only mysterious fluorescent letters, hieroglyphics and pictures showing the history of aliens and how they were perceived by ancient and contemporary civilizations. Some of the displays are presented on screens; audio communications regarding the subject can be heard in the background. The greater part of the collection consists of photographs and corresponding text, but one can also admire physical artifacts such as a model of an alien corpse (at least we hope it’s a model) on an autopsy table, some of the exhibits are also interactive. The most prominently featured themes include: history of the UFO and extraterrestrial sightings, relevant scientific research, alleged crash sites and time travel, but also the general history of Area 51, the military inventions and research, new technology and airplanes tested there, flight suits, uniforms, equipment, samples, models of planes and drones. People important to the projects and leading Area 51 personalities are introduced here as well. This section certainly has the potential to produce quite a disturbing, spooky impression, especially as guests are treated to this super annoying, persistent and sinister sound repeatedly playing about every minute or so. It drove me half-crazy and definitely enhanced the feeling of anxiety and creepiness. Combined with the special lighting the place did appear rather uncanny and out- of-this-world. I was half-expecting a weird-looking, green creature to jump me from around the corner. Still slightly disappointed that it didn’t… Definitely a must-see for all the extraterrestrial enthusiasts out there! PERMANENT EXHIBITS This part of the museum covers several areas of interest, all of them in one way or another connected to the atomic bomb and all presented in a rather extensive way. And so subjects such as development of the actual bomb, radiation, underground testing and atomic culture are addressed here. This section offers interactive displays, you can watch original film footage from the period on multiple touch screens, of course additionally you are able to also view lots of pictures and physical artifacts from the era. I particularly enjoyed a visit to the small Ground Zero Theater, where a simulation of an atomic bomb explosion with live effects takes place: you could literally feel the blast in your face and experience the vibrations. A very well designed and educational adventure I am prepared to happily sample as long as it does not transpire anywhere in my vicinity for real. Not that adventurous thank you. The historical aspect of the exhibition does not only highlight the most important facts about the bomb, but also the daily lives of the employees involved, you can even view a model of an office from the day. We become familiar with the chronology of the Cold War. We are told about how those deadly devices were utilized and tested (including the poor, abused test-dummies on display) and how they inspired every-day products (bombs that is, not dummies). We learn about the mushroom cloud symbolism and what countries were involved in the process of building and detonating this weapon. We find out what equipment, tools and gear were used, how pollution and hazardous materials made it so dangerous to work in this field. We are educated about the effects of testing on environment, the history and geology of the desert area where the tests took place and, of course, the actual models of the bombs. As Nevada obviously was one of the major testing sites it actually appears very appropriate to place this museum here. It’s quite fascinating to piece all this information together and get a clear picture of the enormity of the undertaking. However, please be warned that the collections do contain a lot of technical details which some of us might find more appealing than others. Nonetheless I definitely thought it an intriguing way to spend an afternoon (I would advise to plan about 3-4 hrs for this activity if you would like to be relatively thorough). Especially the exhibits addressing the early days of the bomb: the origins, research, invention and testing made quite an impression on me and drew me in with the whole intensity of my imagination. Blew my mind you might say. Pun intended.
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NATIONAL  ATOMIC TESTING MUSEUM ***** Located in a rather large and imposing building about 10 minutes away from the Strip, this museum is definitely one of the more interesting (and ambitious) attractions Las Vegas has to offer. Basically it consists of two parts: The Area 51 Exhibit and the Permanent Exhibits. If you decide to pay this particular establishment a visit here is what you can expect: AREA 51 – MYTH OR REALITY Unfortunately photography was not permitted in this section, so you will just have to take my word for it. I vouch for my honestly and upstanding character. So here we go. Immediately upon entering the rooms you are enveloped in some rather fierce extraterrestrial vibes: eerie atmosphere, with darkness all around you and only mysterious fluorescent letters, hieroglyphics and pictures showing the history of aliens and how they were perceived by ancient and contemporary civilizations. Some of the displays are presented on screens; audio communications regarding the subject can be heard in the background. The greater part of the collection consists of photographs and corresponding text, but one can also admire physical artifacts such as a model of an alien corpse (at least we hope it’s a model) on an autopsy table, some of the exhibits are also interactive. The most prominently featured themes include: history of the UFO and extraterrestrial sightings, relevant scientific research, alleged crash sites and time travel, but also the general history of Area 51, the military inventions and research, new technology and airplanes tested there, flight suits, uniforms, equipment, samples, models of planes and drones. People important to the projects and leading Area 51 personalities are introduced here as well. This section certainly has the potential to produce quite a disturbing, spooky impression, especially as guests are treated to this super annoying, persistent and sinister sound repeatedly playing about every minute or so. It drove me half-crazy and definitely enhanced the feeling of anxiety and creepiness. Combined with the special lighting the place did appear rather uncanny and out-of-this- world. I was half-expecting a weird-looking, green creature to jump me from around the corner. Still slightly disappointed that it didn’t… Definitely a must-see for all the extraterrestrial enthusiasts out there! PERMANENT EXHIBITS This part of the museum covers several areas of interest, all of them in one way or another connected to the atomic bomb and all presented in a rather extensive way. And so subjects such as development of the actual bomb, radiation, underground testing and atomic culture are addressed here. This section offers interactive displays, you can watch original film footage from the period on multiple touch screens, of course additionally you are able to also view lots of pictures and physical artifacts from the era. I particularly enjoyed a visit to the small Ground Zero Theater, where a simulation of an atomic bomb explosion with live effects takes place: you could literally feel the blast in your face and experience the vibrations. A very well designed and educational adventure I am prepared to happily sample as long as it does not transpire anywhere in my vicinity for real. Not that  adventurous thank you. The historical aspect of the exhibition does not only highlight the most important facts about the bomb, but also the daily lives of the employees involved, you can even view a model of an office from the day. We become familiar with the chronology of the Cold War. We are told about how those deadly devices were utilized and tested (including the poor,j abused test-dummies on display) and how they inspired every-day products (bombs that is, not dummies). We learn about the mushroom cloud symbolism and what countries were involved in the process of building and detonating this weapon. We find out what equipment, tools and gear were used, how pollution and hazardous materials made it so dangerous to work in this field. We are educated about the effects of testing on environment, the history and geology of the desert area where the tests took place and, of course, the actual models of the bombs. As Nevada obviously was one of the major testing sites it actually appears very appropriate to place this museum here. It’s quite fascinating to piece all this information together and get a clear picture of the enormity of the undertaking. However, please be warned that the collections do contain a lot of technical details which some of us might find more appealing than others. Nonetheless I definitely thought it an intriguing way to spend an afternoon (I would advise to plan about 3-4 hrs for this activity if you would like to be relatively thorough). Especially the exhibits addressing the early days of the bomb: the origins, research, invention and testing made quite an impression on me and drew me in with the whole intensity of my imagination. Blew my mind you might say. Pun intended.