English as a Second Language ****** Megan Crane Frustrated with her lackluster life in New York and fed up with her tedious (albeit simultaneously extremely stressful due to boss being slightly psychotic) job as a paralegal, Alex runs into her ex-boyfriend on a night that could not have gone more wrong. Or right, depending on how you, no, pardon me: how ONE sees it. Because dead set (pardon me: quite determined) to prove a point to her former Beau (impudently claiming she would never get into Oxford), our Heroine decides to embrace the life of academia and move to England to pursue her graduate degree. All right, so perhaps she does not exactly get accepted into Oxford (potayto, potahto), nonetheless she does succeed in securing a place at one of the British Universities and promptly finds herself on her way towards intellectual self-discovery. What ensues (between intense, but mostly short-lived bouts of the above mentioned cerebral activity) is a lot of drinking, smoking, dramas (everybody seems to be the star of their personal soap opera) and a great deal of witty dialogue and even wittier reflections on the part of our adventurous Heroine. She falls head over hills in love with her sardonic, enigmatic Professor, makes a fool of herself (repeatedly), and tries her best to somehow catch up on her academic work (and very confusing romantic life) between excruciating hang-overs. One significant fact we most certainly learn from this charming novel is that students in Great Britain consume rather terrifying quantities of alcohol and cigarettes. On one hand I was somewhat alarmed about their health, but on the other I must say I currently feel very deprived. My student life, alas (shaking fist at the sky with equal measures of sorrow and fury), looked absolutely nothing like that at all! Most of the so-called chick lit novels are just shallow, meaningless fluff. Seriously, how many ways can you tell essentially the same story about how she conquers all and gets her guy at the end? So I have this theory that what elevates those books into the category of literature, a creation worth reading is mostly humor, a great virtue justifying the very existence of this genre. Well, English as a Second Language definitely has that! It’s a very easy, entertaining read full of hilarious one-liners and wry observations. Please don’t expect much depth or profound musings about the Universe. What you can expect, however, are some rather poignant, intelligent (and funny) reflections regarding the cultural differences between the British and Americans, family dynamics, diverse romantic endeavors, social relations or pop-culture in general. If I were to indulge in some light criticism I would admit that Ms. Crane’s characters seem a little caricatural at times and could definitely use some more honing. The author also likes to operate with clichés and some of the plot developments blatantly lack even the tiniest pretense of originality (the falling for Mr. Wrong when Mr. Right is directly under your nose scenario or the inevitable gay best friend definitely come to mind). However her use of self-irony and deliciously black humor endeared her to my heart so much I am willing to overlook those flaws. I would, therefore, still recommend this novel: the easy-flowing, humorous style turns it into a breezy, pleasant and rewarding read. In truth it only took a few pages for me to warm up to it. I really enjoyed the ride, even though it made no impact (deep or otherwise) on me besides the entertainment factor at the moment of consumption. Oh fudge, I think I have found it at last, the Holy Grail, the one and only, the perfect beach book!
IF YOU FIND THIS CONTENT USEFUL, FUN OR JUST PLAIN AWESOME, PLEASE:
                                    COPYRIGHT © DEESULTIMATEREVIEWS.COM 2013-2015. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED..
HOME LITERARY CORNER CULTURAL  CORNER 10 BEST/ MOST LIFESTYLE& FITNESS AROUND  THE WORLD PLAY&MUSICAL  REVIEWS CONCERT&SHOW  REVIEWS MUSEUM&EXHIBITION  REVIEWS RESTAURANT  REVIEWS BAR&CLUB  REVIEWS
RATING     ****** excellent     ***** very good     ****good     *** average     ** pretty bad     * horrible

Follow Us

VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!!  VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!! VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!! CARPE DIEM!!! CARPE DIEM!!! CARPE DIEM!!!
English as a Second Language ****** Megan Crane Frustrated with her lackluster life in New York and fed up with her tedious (albeit simultaneously extremely stressful due to boss being slightly psychotic) job as a paralegal, Alex runs into her ex-boyfriend on a night that could not have gone more wrong. Or right, depending on how you, no, pardon me: how ONE sees it. Because dead set (pardon me: quite determined) to prove a point to her former Beau (impudently claiming she would never get into Oxford), our Heroine decides to embrace the life of academia and move to England to pursue her graduate degree. All right, so perhaps she does not exactly get accepted into Oxford (potayto, potahto), nonetheless she does succeed in securing a place at one of the British Universities and promptly finds herself on her way towards intellectual self-discovery. What ensues (between intense, but mostly short- lived bouts of the above mentioned cerebral activity) is a lot of drinking, smoking, dramas (everybody seems to be the star of their personal soap opera) and a great deal of witty dialogue and even wittier reflections on the part of our adventurous Heroine. She falls head over hills in love with her sardonic, enigmatic Professor, makes a fool of herself (repeatedly), and tries her best to somehow catch up on her academic work (and very confusing romantic life) between excruciating hang-overs. One significant fact we most certainly learn from this charming novel is that students in Great Britain consume rather terrifying quantities of alcohol and cigarettes. On one hand I was somewhat alarmed about their health, but on the other I must say I currently feel very deprived. My student life, alas (shaking fist at the sky with equal measures of sorrow and fury), looked absolutely nothing like that at all! Most of the so-called chick lit novels are just shallow, meaningless fluff. Seriously, how many ways can you tell essentially the same story about how she conquers all and gets her guy at the end? So I have this theory that what elevates those books into the category of literature, a creation worth reading is mostly humor, a great virtue justifying the very existence of this genre. Well, English as a Second Language definitely has that! It’s a very easy, entertaining read full of hilarious one-liners and wry observations. Please don’t expect much depth or profound musings about the Universe. What you can expect, however, are some rather poignant, intelligent (and funny) reflections regarding the cultural differences between the British and Americans, family dynamics, diverse romantic endeavors, social relations or pop-culture in general. If I were to indulge in some light criticism I would admit that Ms. Crane’s characters seem a little caricatural at times and could definitely use some more honing. The author also likes to operate with clichés and some of the plot developments blatantly lack even the tiniest pretense of originality (the falling for Mr. Wrong when Mr. Right is directly under your nose scenario or the inevitable gay best friend definitely come to mind). However her use of self-irony and deliciously black humor endeared her to my heart so much I am willing to overlook those flaws. I would, therefore, still recommend this novel: the easy-flowing, humorous style turns it into a breezy, pleasant and rewarding read. In truth it only took a few pages for me to warm up to it. I really enjoyed the ride, even though it made no impact (deep or otherwise) on me besides the entertainment factor at the moment of consumption. Oh fudge, I think I have found it at last, the Holy Grail, the one and only, the perfect beach book!
NAVIGATION MENU
 DEE’S ULTIMATE REVIEWS

Follow Us