IF YOU FIND THIS CONTENT USEFUL, FUN OR JUST PLAIN AWESOME, PLEASE:
                                    COPYRIGHT © DEESULTIMATEREVIEWS.COM 2013-2015. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED..
HOME LITERARY CORNER CULTURAL  CORNER 10 BEST/ MOST LIFESTYLE& FITNESS AROUND  THE WORLD PLAY&MUSICAL  REVIEWS CONCERT&SHOW  REVIEWS MUSEUM&EXHIBITION  REVIEWS RESTAURANT  REVIEWS BAR&CLUB  REVIEWS
STARS OF THE RUSSIAN BALLET ****** 2 February 2013 Presented by the Performing Arts Center of the UNLV (Artemus Ham Hall)  this production featured  a medley of some of the most beloved and iconic scenes from classic story ballets. The program included: - The Rose Adagio from The Sleeping Beauty  (Act I) Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, choreography by Marius Petipa This piece presented elements of traditional ballet in the more formal, rigid style. It involved the performance of the female prima ballerina (Ekaterina Egorova) and four male dancers, courting her with their attentions. Although technically very good, in my opinion it lacked the fluidity and passion of a truly spectacular staging. - The Ocean and the Pearls from The Little Humpbacked Horse Music by Cesare Pugni, choreography by Saint-Leon This excerpt rather impressed me with the artists’ impeccable technique. Watching the two female and one male dancers execute all those immaculate twirls truly made my head spin! - The Quatre Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, choreography by Elena Radchenko This piece had a very delicate, dreamy-like quality to it, it was light and breezy. The performers enchanted with their shepherd costumes, as they gracefully pirouetted around the stage. - Adagio from Cinderella (Act III) Music by Sergei Prokofiev, choreography by Rostislav Zakharov The expressive character of this excerpt was additionally enhanced by the dark, green light. Lyrical and romantic, this piece featured elements of the courtship dance of a happily reunited couple.  - Adagio from Romeo and Juliet  Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Elena Radchenko Based on the Shakespearean drama, this beautiful piece conveyed tragic love and despair, the dancing almost imitating love-making between the two young enamored souls, whose families tried so hard to keep them apart. - Grand Pas de deux from Don Quixote (Act III) Music by Leon Minkus, choreography by Alexander Gorsky Although it could definitely be considered a more vivacious piece, it still featured elements of classical ballet. The dancing imitated the Spanish Flamenco; the costumes were also designed to resemble that style. - Pas de Quatre Music by Cesare Pugni, choreography by Anton Dolin This could be perceived as the perfect example of an ensemble number, where the four female performers presented the highest level of artistry while dancing synchronously. - Allegro Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, choreography by Elena Vitaly Zabelin A more uptempo, dynamic number featuring strong, lively music and spirited dancing. - Dying Swan Music by Camille Saint-Saens, choreography by Michel Fokine Breathtakingly beautiful, for me this piece represents the true essence of the ballet. It’s one of the most memorable scenes from this masterpiece, an example of a truly magnificent occasion when music and motion blend into a profound form of artistic expression. - Selections from Paquita Music by Leon Minkus, choreography by Joseph Mazilier, Marius Petipa. This number stood out as the most elaborate of them all, featuring the most dancers. A very colorful, vibrant piece, which still managed to remain almost poetically lyrical. I really am no ballet expert, so if you expect me to knowledgably mumble a lot of competent-sounding jargon (while simultaneously uttering very reassuring grunting noises), I will have to disappoint you. I love this form of art, however, and am certainly no novice to such performances. That’s why in my conclusion I can state that I found this particular production rather enjoyable mostly because it featured such a variety of different styles, dancing techniques, music genres as well as refreshing changes of tempo, thus providing a welcome overview into the best the classical dance has to offer. The costumes were charming and the performers appeared to be fully trained and very talented professionals. Nonetheless, from time to time I caught myself thinking that this whole effort somehow lacked a certain element of grace and lightness that no technical perfection can make up for.  Something that you can’t quite put your finger on, but this elusive and desirable quality can so strongly influence the audience, causing a delighted frenzy or polite indifference. In some cases the emotions are expressed in an even more extreme manner, with the unfortunate ballerina having to dodge a tomato or two, which might or might not have been thrown onto the stage. Although it goes without saying that this staging was light years away from such a disastrous outcome, I must also admit that I have certainly seen better productions and although pretty good, I would not consider it to be crème de la crème of the World Ballet Scene. For those of you, who would like to get acquainted with some of the greatest stars of the Russian ballet I would recommend        the following materials:

Follow Us

VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!!  VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!! VIVA    LAS    VEGAS!!! CARPE DIEM!!! CARPE DIEM!!! CARPE DIEM!!!
NAVIGATION MENU
STARS OF THE RUSSIAN BALLET ****** 2 February 2013 Presented by the Performing Arts Center of the UNLV (Artemus Ham Hall)  this production featured  a medley of some of the most beloved and iconic scenes from classic story ballets. The program included: - The Rose Adagio from The Sleeping Beauty (Act I) Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, choreography by Marius Petipa This piece presented elements of traditional ballet in the more formal, rigid style. It involved the performance of the female prima ballerina (Ekaterina Egorova) and four male dancers, courting her with their attentions. Although technically very good, in my opinion it lacked the fluidity and passion of a truly spectacular staging. - The Ocean and the Pearls from The Little Humpbacked Horse Music by Cesare Pugni, choreography by Saint- Leon This excerpt rather impressed me with the artists’ impeccable technique. Watching the two female and one male dancers execute all those immaculate twirls truly made my head spin! - The Quatre Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, choreography by Elena Radchenko This piece had a very delicate, dreamy-like quality to it, it was light and breezy. The performers enchanted with their shepherd costumes, as they gracefully pirouetted around the stage. - Adagio from Cinderella (Act III) Music by Sergei Prokofiev, choreography by Rostislav Zakharov The expressive character of this excerpt was additionally enhanced by the dark, green light. Lyrical and romantic, this piece featured elements of the courtship dance of a happily reunited couple.  - Adagio from Romeo and Juliet  Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Elena Radchenko Based on the Shakespearean drama, this beautiful piece conveyed tragic love and despair, the dancing almost imitating love- making between the two young enamored souls, whose families tried so hard to keep them apart. - Grand Pas de deux from Don Quixote  (Act III) Music by Leon Minkus, choreography by Alexander Gorsky Although it could definitely be considered a more vivacious piece, it still featured elements of classical ballet. The dancing imitated the Spanish Flamenco; the costumes were also designed to resemble that style. - Pas de Quatre Music by Cesare Pugni, choreography by Anton Dolin This could be perceived as the perfect example of an ensemble number, where the four female performers presented the highest level of artistry while dancing synchronously. - Allegro Music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, choreography by Elena Vitaly Zabelin A more uptempo, dynamic number featuring strong, lively music and spirited dancing. - Dying Swan Music by Camille Saint-Saens, choreography by Michel Fokine Breathtakingly beautiful, for me this piece represents the true essence of the ballet. It’s one of the most memorable scenes from this masterpiece, an example of a truly magnificent occasion when music and motion blend into a profound form of artistic expression. - Selections from Paquita Music by Leon Minkus, choreography by Joseph Mazilier, Marius Petipa. This number stood out as the most elaborate of them all, featuring the most dancers. A very colorful, vibrant piece, which still managed to remain almost poetically lyrical. I really am no ballet expert, so if you expect me to knowledgably mumble a lot of competent- sounding jargon (while simultaneously uttering very reassuring grunting noises), I will have to disappoint you. I love this form of art, however, and am certainly no novice to such performances. That’s why in my conclusion I can state that I found this particular production rather enjoyable mostly because it featured such a variety of different styles, dancing techniques, music genres as well as refreshing changes of tempo, thus providing a welcome overview into the best the classical dance has to offer. The costumes were charming and the performers appeared to be fully trained and very talented professionals. Nonetheless, from time to time I caught myself thinking that this whole effort somehow lacked a certain element of grace and lightness that no technical perfection can make up for.  Something that you can’t quite put your finger on, but this elusive and desirable quality can so strongly influence the audience, causing a delighted frenzy or polite indifference. In some cases the emotions are expressed in an even more extreme manner, with the unfortunate ballerina having to dodge a tomato or two, which might or might not have been thrown onto the stage. Although it goes without saying that this staging was light years away from such a disastrous outcome, I must also admit that I have certainly seen better productions and although pretty good, I would not consider it to be crème de la crème of the World Ballet Scene. For those of you, who would like to get acquainted with some of the greatest stars of the Russian ballet I would recommend        the following materials:
 DEE’S ULTIMATE REVIEWS

Follow Us